CFSEU-BC Takes Proactive Step to Educate Public on Dangers of Privately Made Firearms

The Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of British Columbia (CFSEU-BC) is taking the proactive step to offer educational information to the public on the dangers of privately made firearms (PMF’s) such as 3D printed firearms. Parents, educators, businesses and communities may not be aware the risks which can arise from these items that often resemble harmless toys.

The global growth of these PMF’s is significant and, although British Columbia has not seen the same increases yet, we expect this trend to continue. CFSEU-BC wants to take the opportunity now to provide the public with information about the dangers these firearms represent and tips on how to mitigate the potential harm they may cause in the future.

PMF’s often referred to as “Ghost Guns” are a growing phenomenon that have obvious appeal to individuals intending to use them for a criminal purpose. The appeal comes from the fact these firearms are untraceable making their origins unknown. Many of the parts used to manufacture PMF’s are unregulated which provides opportunity for criminal networks to create new avenues for firearm trafficking schemes and networks bypassing legislation surrounding firearms.

CFSEU-BC is working closely with our law enforcement partners here in British Columbia, across Canada and internationally to combat these criminal efforts. But the general public, including our youth, are also able to access this technology and may not realize the risks of what they can create.

No one can print a fully functional firearm from these data files, but, every day, the technology is able to produce more and more of the parts required. Some of the missing conversion kit pieces which can be purchased in stores or online would also seem harmless but, if the two are combined, can achieve a working firearm.

We want to inform anyone who has already or is considering purchasing a 3D printer for their children, school, or business that along with legitimate uses the printer can also be programmed to print firearm parts or other weapons. Being aware of the risks and the need to monitor what is being printed will greatly improve the safety of everyone involved.

Below are tips you can utilize to mitigate any risk associated with 3D printers;

– Know what you, your children, students or employees are printing
– Be aware of blueprints that are easily accessible online but are clearly identifiable as firearms plans
– Do not produce 3D printed parts for others

“CFSEU-BC works collaboratively with partner agencies in the province, nationally and internationally when developing public safety strategies to address criminal activity associated to organized crime,” says Assistant Commissioner Manny Mann, Chief Officer for CFSEU-BC. “Educating the public on Privately Made Firearms and the unexpected risks they could pose to all of us reflects the overall effort to ensure public safety.”

Media Spokesperson: Sergeant Brenda Winpenny

Cell: 604-838-6800

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